Home

Home Page

Accounts

Syndication

Media Centers

Home
Richmond IndyMedia Live! Every Tuesday, 12:30 - 1PM on 97.3 WRIR LP-FM, and streaming online from wrir.org!

LOCAL Announcement :: Media : Miscellaneous

Folk Film: An Evening of Films about Appalachian Culture

A tie-in to the National Folk Festival being held this weekend (october 13 through the 15), Richmond Moving Image Co-op has organized a program celebrating Appalachian culture through independent film.

Thursday, October 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the Firehouse Theatre (1609 W. Broad Street). Admission is $5.

Featuring the films of APPALSHOP and director Herb E. Smith (The Ralph Stanley Story), Folk Film will screen the following 4 short films:

Nimrod Workman: To Fit My Own Category (directors Scott Faulkner & Anthony Stone, b & w, 35 mins., 1975)
Quilting Women (director Elizabeth Barrett, color, 28 mins., 1976)
Unbroken Tradition: Jerry Brown Pottery (director Herb E. Smith, color,
28 mins., 1989) w/ director Herb E. Smith in person!
Minnie Black’s Gourd Band (director Anne Johnson, color, 28 mins., 1988)
Appalshop began in 1969 in Whitesburg, Kentucky as an experiment in community-based filmmaking whose mission is to chronicle the traditional culture of the people of the mountains and valleys of the Applachians. Stylistically, Appalshop documentaries resemble the “direct cinema? of renowned documentarians Albert and David Maysles, Frederick Wiseman and D.A. Pennebaker, acknowledging the speaker’s ability to tell his/her own story. Featuring the omniscient camera and largely unnarrated, Appalshop films allow viewers their own interpretation of the subjects presented. The film subjects are varied — environment, labor, story-telling, music, arts and crafts, education and health issues — and have been screened in dozens of festivals, including the 2001 edition of the James River Film Festival, which featured appearances by filmmakers Elizabeth Barrett and Herb E. Smith, and screenings of their respective films, Stranger with a Camera and The Ralph Stanley Story.

THE PROGRAM: FOUR SHORT FILMS

Nimrod Workman: To Fit My Own Category
(directors Scott Faulkner & Anthony Stone, b & w, 35 mins., 1975)
Nimrod Workman provided for his family of thirteen by working the coal mines of West Virginia. Nimrod’s reminisces about mining and union organizing in the ‘20s and ‘30s are intercut with his home routines—cooking and eating, building an addition to his house, digging for yellow root — and his impromptu performances of the traditional ballads and original songs for which he won a National Heritage Award. Of special interest for labor issues, folklore and folk music, and aging.

Quilting Women
(director Elizabeth Barrett, color, 28 mins., 1976 )
“Wintertime come and snow on the ground, I’m just as happy as I can be a-quiltin’?, claims Louama Banks in this warm and colorful look at the process of traditional Appalachian quilting. From the cutting and piecing to the social aspects of the quilting bee, this low-keyed tribute is a celebration of both an art and a way of life as the quilters comment on the origins of the patterns, the satisfactions of accomplishment and the companionship of the group as they work, gab and laugh together over the quilting frame. Of special interest for women’s studies and folk arts.

Unbroken Tradition: Jerry Brown Pottery
(director Herb E. Smith, color,
28 mins., 1989) w/ director Herb E. Smith in person!
Going back to 1800, Jerry Brown of Hamilton, Alabama, is a ninth generation potter who continues churning out distinctive bowls, jugs and pitchers in much the same fashion as his forefathers did. Unbroken Tradition follows Brown as he digs his own clay, prepares it with a mule-driven pug-mill, works it on the wheel and fires it in his wood-fired, groundhog-style kiln. Along the way he comments on how pottery has shaped his life and the lives of his family and the uncertainties of the survival of the hand-made product in an industrial society. Of special interest for folk art studies. Mr. Smith will be available for questions after the program!

Minnie Black’s Gourd Band
(director Anne Johnson, color, 28 mins., 1988)
Minnie Black of East Bernstadt, Kentucky is ninety years old but too busy to worry about her age now that she’s been on The Johnny Carson Show. What with her Gourd Museum, the band, and a garden full of her specially grown gourds, she’s just about worn out! Follow Minnie through this exhilarating piece as she offers tips on growing good gourds, tours the museum and heads up to the “World’s Largest Gourd Convention? in Mt. Gilead, Ohio, where fellow gourd artists and enthusiasts have dubbed her “Queen of the Gourd People?. Interspersed are several lively and unique versions of popular favorites by Minnie and her senior citizen gourd band. Of special interest for aging issues, women’s studies and folk arts.
 
 


This site made manifest by dadaIMC software

[Valid RSS]